TSCD: Book II, Chapters IV, V, and VI

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau translated by George Douglas Howard Cole CHAPTER IV: THE LIMITS OF THE SOVEREIGN POWER If the State is a moral person whose life is in the union of its members, and if the most important of its cares is the care for its own preservation, it must have a universal and compelling […]

TSCD: Book II, Chapters I, II, and III

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau translated by George Douglas Howard Cole CHAPTER I: THAT SOVEREIGNTY IS INALIENABLE The first and most important deduction from the principles we have so far laid down is that the general will alone can direct the State according to the object for which it was instituted, i.e. the common good: for if the clashing […]

TSCD: Book I, Chapters VII, VIII, and IX

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau translated by George Douglas Howard Cole CHAPTER VII: THE SOVEREIGN This formula shows us that the act of association comprises a mutual undertaking between the public and the individuals, and that each individual, in making a contract, as we may say, with himself, is bound in a double capacity; as a member […]

TSCD: Book I, Chapters V and VI

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau translated by George Douglas Howard Cole CHAPTER V: THAT WE MUST ALWAYS GO BACK TO A FIRST CONVENTION Even if I granted all that I have been refuting, the friends of despotism would be no better off. There will always be a great difference between subduing a multitude and ruling a society. […]

TSCD: Book I, Chapters III and IV

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau translated by George Douglas Howard Cole CHAPTER III: THE RIGHT OF THE STRONGEST The strongest is never strong enough to be always the master, unless he transforms strength into right, and obedience into duty. Hence the right of the strongest, which, though to all seeming meant ironically, is really laid down as […]

TSCD: Book I, Chapters I and II

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau translated by George Douglas Howard Cole FOREWORD This little treatise is part of a longer work which I began years ago without realising my limitations, and long since abandoned. Of the various fragments that might have been extracted from what I wrote, this is the most considerable, and, I think, the least […]

TSCD: Appendix

APPENDIX[1] A famous author, reckoning up the good and evil of human life, and comparing the aggregates, finds that our pains greatly exceed our pleasures: so that, all things considered, human life is not at all a valuable gift. This conclusion does not surprise me; for the writer drew all his arguments from man in […]

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